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WATCH: Cornwall town honours famous inventor at Trevithick Day

WATCH: Cornwall town honours famous inventor at Trevithick Day

Published by the Pirate FM News Team at 4:36pm 27th April 2018.

Thousands gather in one Cornish town to honour the man who designed the world's first moving steam engine.

Camborne Trevithick Day celebrates the life of engineer Richard Trevithick and is being held on Saturday.

It will see hundreds of school children, families and members of the community join together.

Among festivities will be a special parade, with working models making their way through the town, as well as entertainment and dancing.

Organiser Val Dulley said: "Stages will be going up in different areas of the town, from the School of Rock to traditional male voice choirs.

"We have around 24 steam engines too, as well as the children, miners and bal maidens dance and the afternoon Trevithick dance with the adults.

"We are also operating a park and ride scheme from Cornwall College, using the Cornwall Preservation Society's buses - so that's quite a feature as well.

"I just hope people come and really have a wonderful day."

Find out where to park here.

Watch the highlights from last year...

 

So who was Trevithick?

Richard Trevithick (1771-1833) - a Short Biography

(original research by Marj Rowland)

Richard Trevithick was born in a cottage a mile or so from Dolcoath Mine, where his father was a mine Captain. His curiosity about the engineering aspects of the mining area that he grew up in started at an early age, and this led to a career during which he pioneered the use of high pressure steam, and increased the efficiency of the engines used to pump water from the lower levels of Cornwall's tin and copper mines.

Trevithick's inventive mind was never still - his ideas ranged from the first successful self-powered road vehicle, and a steam railway engine, to schemes for wreck salvage, land reclamation, mechanical refrigeration, agricultural machinery and for tunnelling under the Thames.

Trevithick's career spanned the dawn of the industrial revolution, a time when Cornwall's engineering prowess was the envy of the world.

Trevithick spent eleven years in South America, working for owners of silver mines.

Richard Trevithick is buried in an unmarked grave at Dartford, Kent, where he was working when he died.

Like many great men and women, Trevithick did not get the recognition he deserved during his lifetime.

Indeed, his worth has only recently been recognised by many history books.

He did not acquire riches either; any wealth that came Trevithick's way soon disappeared as he developed his next idea- one of his last ideas, for a competition for a memorial to the "Reform Bill", was for a thousand feet high cast iron column with an air operated lift to convey passengers up the inside!

Source: www.trevithick-day.org.uk

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