Pirate FM News

WATCH: Will there be a heatwave in Cornwall this summer?

sunbathing

Published by Emma Carton at 7:25am 12th June 2018. (Updated at 2:16pm 12th June 2018)

The Met Office says it cannot rule out a heatwave for Cornwall this summer.

The average top temperatures for June are around 13 degrees.

Now forecasters have said there could be pockets where it is warmer than that.

Spokesman Grahame Madge says nothing is guaranteed: "What we can say is that with the three-month outlook that we've published, looking at June and then the whole of summer, is that there is a greater than average chance that the average temperature on summer will be warmer than average!.

So, a law of averages then? Well, here is hoping eh?!

Grahame added: "Our average temperatures tend to be made up of some warmer periods and some cooler periods.

"What we think is, looking at the global climate signals and weather nearer to home, that it's more likely that temperatures will be warmer than average".

What is the long range forecast?

From Saturday, the Met Office says: "Saturday is likely to be changeable with a mixture of sunshine and scattered showers. Some showers could be heavy with a risk of hail and thunder. Temperatures will be around average, but it will feel cooler than of late. A band of rain is then likely to move in from the west during Sunday, possible turning heavy at times, mainly in the west".

They add: "Changeable pattern is likely to continue through the rest of this forecast period with most places seeing sunny spells interspersed with cloudier skies, scattered showers and some longer spells of rain.

"There is a chance that drier and warmer conditions could develop towards the end of this period".

What about July?

The Met Office says: "Whilst there is low confidence in the forecast detail during this outlook period, there is a signal that there will be a return to more settled and drier weather through the end of June and the first week of July, but still with a chance of more showery interludes.

"Temperatures are likely to be warmer than average overall both by day and overnight, and there is a possibility of some very warm or even hot spells, these most likely in the south".

Warm or even hot spells in the south - we will take that!

You can read more on the Met Office's summer weather predictions here.

 

What is a heatwave?

The Met Office says: "A heatwave refers to a prolonged period of hot weather, which may be accompanied by high humidity.

"We currently use the World Meteorological Organization guidelines, which is 'when the daily maximum temperature of more than five consecutive days exceeds the average maximum temperature by 5 °C, the normal period being 1961-1990'.

"They are common in the northern and southern hemisphere during summer, but classification and impacts vary globally".

Why do heatwaves happen?

The Met Office says: "Heatwaves are most common in summer when high pressure develops across an area.

"High pressure systems are slow moving and can persist over an area for a prolonged period of time such as days or weeks. 

"They can occur in the UK due to the location of the jet stream, which is usually to the north of the UK in the summer.

"This can allow high pressure to develop over the UK resulting in persistent dry and settled weather".

NHS Choices has this advice for coping with the heat:

 

  • Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside. You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler.
  • Avoid the heat: stay out of the sun and don't go out between 11am and 3pm (the hottest part of the day) if you're vulnerable to the effects of heat.
  • Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn't possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter).
  • Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water.
  • Drink cold drinks regularly, such as water and diluted fruit juice. Avoid excess alcohol, caffeine (tea, coffee and cola) or drinks high in sugar.
  • Listen to alerts on the radio, TV and social media about keeping cool. 
  • Plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water and any medications you need.
  • Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool.
  • Wear loose, cool clothing, and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors.
  • Check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves.

How to protect yourself in the sun, including the 'right way' to apply sunscreen...

Contact Us

If you would like to submit a query or provide more information on this story please get in touch below.

Please wait...
  • Up to 3 JPG or PNG images, 2MB max size
  • We will always endeavour to credit you when we publish your pictures.
  • By uploading you are agreeing to this non-exclusive reuse, royalty-free, across all Pirate FM platforms, which extends to our partner broadcasters.
  • You retain copyright to all images.
  • If you would like to send us a video, please upload to YouTube or similar and paste the video URL into the message above.
Email Icon

Sign up for exclusive news, competitions and offers.
Proper Local News updates from Pirate FM

Suggested articles

Pirate Extra Pirate 70s Escape LoveCornwall