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WATCH: Beavers born in Cornwall for first time in 400 years

beaver

Published by the Pirate FM News Team at 6:16pm 21st June 2018. (Updated at 3:16pm 22nd June 2018)

The first baby beavers to be born in Cornwall in 400 years have been caught on camera.

Now juvenile beavers, known as kits, have been spotted playing in the water on a farm near Truro.

Their parents arrived at Ladock last year, as part of a project to reintroduce the creatures.

The five-acre fenced site at Woodland Valley appears to be the perfect spot for these litter creatures!

They were filmed after farmer Chris Jones spotted them at the start of the week and alerted project partner Cornwall Wildlife Trust.

The Cornwall Beaver Project team were all hoping for some good views during their regular Wednesday night beaver walk.

Then filmmaker Nina Constable managed to snap this footage for BBC Springwatch...

 

The Cornish beaver pair have been busy since their release last summer, making themselves at home in their enclosure on the farm.

It means the Cornwall Beaver Project witnessed the first beaver lodge being built in Cornwall for hundreds of years.

As well as this, a smaller lodge appeared on site earlier in the year which initially caused confusion.

However, it was soon realised this was the male beaver building a temporary bachelor pad, as he had likely been asked to leave the lodge while the female was nursing.

All the signs were there and the team have sat poised for the last month waiting in anticipation for the first glimpse of a beaver kit.

Frankie Howie, chair of Cornwall Wildlife Trust's Conservation Strategy Committee was thrilled.

"This is a fantastic milestone for the Cornwall Beaver Project – it clearly shows the beavers are in their element and all their hard work making a new home was for a very good reason!"

beavers

The baby beavers at Ladock: Nina Constable

For the last twelve months the Cornwall Beaver Project team say they have been in awe, seeing these creatures transforming the site and creating new wildlife habitat areas.

The project has been lucky to have willing wildlife enthusiasts throughout the year coming to carry out surveys on the site’s flora and fauna.

Other good news has been an increased number of bats around the enclosure, including some very rare species such as barbastelle and greater horseshoe bats.

The beaver dams hold more water at the top of the catchment, in pools, which in turn means more insects for bats to feed on.

Holding the water upstream is also great for flood prevention downstream - researchers involved in the project estimate that water now takes an hour to drain through the site when it used to take just 15 minutes - this is significant as Ladock village suffers from flooding so slowing the flow of water could form part of the solution.

People who would like to come and visit The Cornwall Beaver Project can take part in walks on Wednesday evenings throughout the summer - and may even be lucky enough to catch a glimpse of the new kits themselves!

You can book them here and all proceeds go back into running the project with Chris Jones at Woodland Valley Farm.

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